Bobby Wolff
Bobby Wolff

Wikipedia: Robert S. (Bobby) Wolff (born October 14, 1932, San Antonio, Texas) is an American bridge player, writer, and administrator. He is the only person to win world championships in five different categories. 

Wolff was an original member of the Dallas Aces team, which was formed in 1968 to compete against the Italian Blue Team which was dominant at the time. The Aces were successful and won their first world championship in 1970. Wolff has won 11 world championships, over 30 North American championships, and was the president of World Bridge Federation (WBF) 1992–1994, and served as president of American Contract Bridge League (ACBL) 1987. He is the author of a tell-all on bridge chronicling 60 years on the scene, entitled The Lone Wolff, published by Master Point Press. His column, The Aces on Bridge has been appearing daily for over 32 years, is syndicated by United Feature Syndicate in more than 130 newspapers worldwide and is available online two weeks in arrears.

IMPs Dealer South. Both Vul

K J 10 6
A J 5
10 8 6 2
Q J
A Q 9 8 7 5
6
A K 7
A 10 5
West North East South
1
Pass 3 Pass 4
Pass 4 Pass 5
Pass 5 Pass 6
Pass Pass Pass

“A wise man gets more use from his enemies than a fool from his friends” Baltasar Gracian.

West led the 10.

Plan the play for South.

At the table, South lost today´s slam because he took the most direct route in sight. He should have dallied for a while and allowed his enemies to be of help.

Dummy´sA won, trumps were drawn and theQ was led from dummy for a losing finesse. West led another heart and South ruffed, but it was all but over. When theQ-J did not fall under South’s A-K, the defenders eventually scored a diamond to net one down.

The slam makes if South gives West the opportunity to help. At trick two, he should ruuf a low heart from dummy and then play the ace and king of trumps. Dummy´s last heart is ruffed to eliminate that suit, and South then play theA, K and another diamond. West is forced to win and South is in luck. A heart lead offers a ruff and discard ( a club from dummy), and a club lead offers a free finesse.

What is East could have won the third diamond instead of West? Then South could still fall back on the club finesse for a second chance. If an unsuccessful club finesse is taken early in the play, South’s chances for and endplay disappear.

The full deal:

K J 10 6
A J 5
10 8 6 2
Q J
4 3
10 9 8 7
Q J 5
K 9 4 2
2
K Q 4 3 2
9 4 3
8 7 6 3
A Q 9 8 7 5
6
A K 7
A 10 5

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