Bobby Wolff
Bobby Wolff

Wikipedia: Robert S. (Bobby) Wolff (born October 14, 1932, San Antonio, Texas) is an American bridge player, writer, and administrator. He is the only person to win world championships in five different categories. 

Wolff was an original member of the Dallas Aces team, which was formed in 1968 to compete against the Italian Blue Team which was dominant at the time. The Aces were successful and won their first world championship in 1970. Wolff has won 11 world championships, over 30 North American championships, and was the president of World Bridge Federation (WBF) 1992–1994, and served as president of American Contract Bridge League (ACBL) 1987. He is the author of a tell-all on bridge chronicling 60 years on the scene, entitled The Lone Wolff, published by Master Point Press. His column, The Aces on Bridge has been appearing daily for over 32 years, is syndicated by United Feature Syndicate in more than 130 newspapers worldwide and is available online two weeks in arrears.

IMPs Dealer South. Both Vul

K 10 9
Q
Q 10 7 2
K J 9 6 3
A Q J 5
A J 7
K 6 3
Q 5 4
West North East South
1NT
Pass 3NT Pass Pass
Pass

“You cannot step twice into the same river, for other waters are continually flowing in” Heraclitus.

West leads the 6. Dummy’s Q won the trick and a club was led to South’s queen, which wins

How should South continue?

It’s usually best to first develop tricks in one’s longest and strongest suit, but not always. It also pays to be selective about which defender is allowed to win a trick.

Dummy’s Q won and a club was led to South’s queen. A second club was led to dummy’s jack, but the 4-1 club break brought bad news. East won and returned a heart, and the defenders won the race for tricks. South could score only eight tricks before the defenders took control, South went one down.

To make the game, South must play to keep East off lead as long as possible. After the Q holds, a club to South’s queen is correct, but South must not lead clubs again too soon. Instead, he crosses to dummy with the 9 and leads a low diamond. If East hops up with his ace, South has an easy nine tricks, so East must duck, allowing South’s K to score. South the switches back to clubs and assures nine tricks

What if West had held the A instead of East? He could capture South’s K but it wouldn’t matter. West could not attack the hearts without losing a trick, and South would still have time to develop his ninth winner.

The full deal:

K 10 9
Q
Q 10 7 2
K J 9 6 3
7 6 4 3
K 10 8 6 3
8 5 4
8
8 2
9 5 4 2
A J 9
A 10 7 2
A Q J 5
A J 7
K 6 3
Q 5 4

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