Source: “Play Bridge with the Aces”

Why do some players recognize the correct play only after it is too late? Sometimes it is discovery of the laction of the opponents cards. Many times it’s becuase a tempting and good line of play was easily apparent.

Dealer South Both Vul

A J 6
8 4 3 2
A Q 3
K J 6
K Q 10 9 8 2
6 5
10 5 2
A 3
West North East South
2
Pass 4 Pass Pass
Pass

Opening Lead K

In one room, the defense started with three rounds of hearts, East playing high low to encourage, South ruffing the third round.

Declarer extracted three rounds of trumps ending in his hand. A low diamond was led to dummy and que Q finesse.

East won the K and returned a diamond, dislodging dummy’s ace. Declarer played the A. followed by a low club to dummy’s J. The finesse lost to East’s Q and the contract was defeated two tricks. Declarer had lost both minor suit finesses. Had either been successful, he would have made his contract.

When the hand was played in the other room, declarer also realized that he would make the hand if either of the minor suit finesses would succeed. However, declarer also saw another play that would provide an extra chance to make the contract.

Instead of extracting three rounds of trumps ending in his hand, declarer extracted three rounds of trumps ending in dummy, now he led the last heart from dummy.

When East played the Q declarer let him hold the trick and discrded a diamond. East was nos stuck with the lead and could no escape giving declarer his tenth trick via a free fineeses in either minor suit.

What if East had held only 3 hearts? Declarer would then ruff the fourth hear and fall back o the chance of succeding in either one of the minor suit finesses.

The complete deal:

A J 6
8 4 3 2
A Q 3
K J 6
7 4 3
A K 10
J 9 4
10 8 7 4
5
Q J 9 7
K 8 7 6
Q 9 5 3
K Q 10 9 8 2
6 5
10 5 2
A 3