Source: Herald-Journal – 18 Ene 1938

A slam in spades, with the West player holding five spades, and declarer’s hand only four after the second lead.

Harry J. Fishbein of New York, who with Mrs. Samuel Rush won the mixed pair championship at the National Championships tournament in Washington last December, gained some of the match points giving him his championship by the way he played a slam in spades, with the West player holding five spades, and his own hand only four after the second lead.

2Heart Suit = Strong

Lead: club suit 6

The club return was ruffed, and Fishbein laid down one round of trumps, and got the bad news that West held one more trump than he did. He now cashed the heart ace, as there was no chance to make the hand if West should be blank in hearts. His next play was unusual. Before continuing hearts, he laid down the ace of diamonds and then con-tinued to lead hearts.

West soon round that he was helpless.

If he trumped, dummy would overtrump and a trump return would pick up, he West trumps and give South his contract.

If Fishbein had not cashed the diamond ace before leading out his hearts. West would have discarded his lone diamond.

West eventually ruffed, dummy over-ruffed and returned a trump and the hand was made.

This hand caused lots of trouble for the experts. Obviously, play in hearts is impossible, against a spade opening which East will ruff, and then cash the club ace. This, in fact, is just what happened to one expert.

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