Bobby Wolff
Bobby Wolff

Wikipedia: Robert S. (Bobby) Wolff (born October 14, 1932, San Antonio, Texas) is an American bridge player, writer, and administrator. He is the only person to win world championships in five different categories. 

Wolff was an original member of the Dallas Aces team, which was formed in 1968 to compete against the Italian Blue Team which was dominant at the time. The Aces were successful and won their first world championship in 1970. Wolff has won 11 world championships, over 30 North American championships, and was the president of World Bridge Federation (WBF) 1992–1994, and served as president of American Contract Bridge League (ACBL) 1987. He is the author of a tell-all on bridge chronicling 60 years on the scene, entitled The Lone Wolff, published by Master Point Press. His column, The Aces on Bridge has been appearing daily for over 32 years, is syndicated by United Feature Syndicate in more than 130 newspapers worldwide and is available online two weeks in arrears.

Dealer North. Neither Vul

K 8 6 5 4
9 3
J 7 5
8 3 2

A Q J 10 7 6 5
A Q 10
A 7 4
West North East South
Pass 1NT Dbl
2 2 Pass 4
Pass Pass Pass

“The greater our knowledge increases the greater our ignorance unfolds” _ John F. Kennedy.

Opening leadQ.

South ruffed and saw four possible losers. He couldn´t do anything about losing two clubs, but he could manage a diamond finesse if he could find theK with West. (TheK with West wouldn’t work.)

At trick two, he led a low heart to dummy’s nine, willing to lose a trick to West’s hoped for king. East took his trump king and led clubs, and now South was finished. The defenders took their four tricks, and it took South’s 100 honors to even the score.

Do you agree with South’s logic? Could South have done better?

East’s opening bid should have told South that his play wouldn’t work, especially since West appears to hold theQ-J. Either he forgot East’s opening bid or he didn’t see the alternative possibilities.

South makes his game by playing East for a doubleton king in either red suit. At trick two, he leads hisQ. If East wins, dummy’s9 provides an entry to take the diamond finesse. If East ducks, South counters by leading hisQ, and this time East cannot afford to duck. East exits with a club to South’s ace, and dummy is entered via theJ. The obvious trump finesse follows, and South brings home an exciting ten tricks.

K 8 6 5 4
9 3
J 7 5
8 3 2
Q J 10 9
4
9 8 4 3 2
9 6 5
A 7 3 2
K 8 2
K 6
K Q J 10

A Q J 10 7 6 5
A Q 10
A 7 4

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