Source: IBPA Column Service APR 2021

Tim Bourke
Tim Bourke

**Source: wikipedia: Tim Bourke “is an Australian bridge player and writer. His joint project with Justin Corfield “the Art of Declarer Play” won the International Bridge Press Book of the Year award in 2014.

IMPs Dealer North. Both Vul

A J 5
A 10 9 8 4
K 4 2
9 5
8 4
K Q 2
A Q J 6
A K Q 6
West North East South
1 3 5
5 Pass 5NT
Pass 6 Pass 7NT
Pass Pass Pass

South’s leap to five hearts asked for a spade control and North duly showed his ace of spades, which South knew could not be a void, for otherwise North would not have had an opening bid. 5NT asked for more information and North bid his king of diamonds. The final leap to 7NT was not a big gamble, on the grounds that North had an opening bid and East likely had both the king and queen of spades.

West led the 10. Declarer played low from dummy and was surprised to see East discard a spade. After winning the first trick in hand with the jack of diamonds, declarer cashed three top clubs, discarding a spade from dummy. When East discarded a spade on the third club, declarer knew that East must have at least three hearts.

So, declarer cashed his king of hearts, noting that both defenders followed with low cards. Next, declarer led a spade to dummy’s ace. When West followed with the two of spades, declarer counted East as have started with an original 7=4=0=2 distribution (and West with an initial 1=1=6=5 shape).

So, declarer led the ten of hearts next and ran it when East played low. As expected, West could not follow, so declarer cashed the queen of hearts and claimed 13 tricks – one spade, five hearts, four diamonds and three clubs. Since East observed that a spade lead would surely have beaten seven notrump, knocking out a dummy entry prematurely, he unkindly inquired if West had seen the bidding.

The complete deal:

A J 5
A 10 9 8 4
K 4 2
9 5
2
7
10 9 8 7 5 3
8 7 4 3 2
K Q 10 9 7 6 3
J 6 5 3

J 10
8 4
K Q 2
A Q J 6
A K Q 6

 Don’t forget to follow us @