Source: Las Vegas Daily Bulletins

 

A K 9 3
9
K 10 9 6 2
A J 10
J 10 2
K 7 3 2
A Q J 8
Q 9

You open 1, partner responds 1, East joins in with 2, you make a support double showing three spades (a raise to 2shows four) and suddenly, you find yourself playing 6!

Eddie Kantar
Eddie Kantar

West leads the 5, East wins the A and returns the Q, West following with a higher heart. How do you proceed? Both follow to the first diamond. You have no convenient discard from dummy on the K, so do yourself a favor and ruff the second heart, noticing West’s heart higher than the 5 indicating three hearts.

The play now revolves around the best way to tackle the black suits for no losers. Clearly, if either finesse works you make your slam, but which one to take? Surely you are not going to fall for that question any longer. Start by drawing two rounds of trumps and leading the J hoping for a cover.

West may cover hoping partner has the 10. If the jack isn’t covered, win the ace and cash the king hoping to drop the queen. If you do, you won’t need the club finesse.

If you have no luck in spades, return to your hand with a trump and run the Q, your last chance. Congrats. You didn’t put all of your eggs in either the Q or the K finesse basket. You worked with spades hoping to drop the queen (not to mention giving West a chance to err by covering the J). And all the while, you had the club finesse in reserve.

The full deal:

A K 9 3
9
K 10 9 6 2
A J 10
8 7 5 4
8 6 5
7 4 3
8 6 4
Q 6
A Q J 10 4
5
K 7 5 3 2
J 10 2
K 7 3 2
A Q J 8
Q 9

Don’t forget – you can still enter for the 6th World Youth Open Bridge Championships being held in Croatia from 20 – 29 August.

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