Source: ORLANDO-FALL NABC 2016-NOV. 24-DIC. 4

Dealer South. Both Vul

K 10 2
A 6 3
A K 10
Q J 7 6
A Q J 9 8 5
5 4 2
J 4 3
8

You open 2, weak, in first seat. West passes, partner bids 4, everyone passes and West leads the 10 to dummy’s jack, East’s king and your 8. East makes the expected shift to the Q. Plan the play. Both opponents follow to the first round of spades.

Solution:

The full deal:

K 10 2
A 6 3
A K 10
Q J 7 6
7 6
K 8 7
8 7 6 2
10 9 5 3
4 3
Q J 10 9
Q 9 5
A K 4 2
A Q J 9 8 5
5 4 2
J 4 3
8

The idea on this one is to appreciate the value of your lower club spot cards once the 10, jack and the king are out of play. At this point, the two highest remaining clubs in the opponents’ hands are the ace and 9 and your side remains with the  Q-7-6. What does it all mean? Watch. Notice you have four possible losers, two hearts, a club and a diamond.

Eddie Kantar
Eddie Kantar

Win the A, draw as many trump as necessary, ending in dummy, and lead the Q, which will be covered by the ace (or else you will discard a heart and have 10 tricks). Say it is covered and you ruff. Now cross to a high diamond and lead the 7, intending to discard a heart if it is not covered.

If East has the 9 and covers, you ruff, cross to dummy with a diamond and discard a red-suit loser on the 6. If West has the 9, he will win the trick, be able to cash one heart (all you have left) and your possible diamond loser vanishes on the 6, no diamond finesse needed. Loser on loser plays like this abound.