Source: IBPA Column Service AUG. 2019

IMPs Dealer East. E/W Vul

K 8 6
9 6 4
A Q 6 2
A K J
A Q J 7
5
8 7 5 3
Q 10 9 3
West North East South
2 Dbl Pass 3
Pass 4 Pass Pass
Pass

West’s opening bid was a standard weak two in hearts – promising a six-card suit and about six to ten points. North felt that he had to do something with his strong hand and so chose to make a takeout double. South’s jump to three spades was invitational in the suit while denying a heart stopper (with a heart stopper and four spades he would have bid a Lebensohl two notrump at his first turn then continued with three spades over North’s forced three-club rebid).

Tim Bourke
Tim Bourke

West began the defence with the ace and king of hearts. As there was no point in discarding a diamond on the second heart, declarer ruffed, then paused to consider his options. He decided that it was unlikely that West had the king of diamonds or that trumps were 3-3: East was a favourite to have started with four trumps.

Consequently, declarer had to sever the defensive transportation link in hearts. So, he cashed the ace and queen of trumps, crossed to dummy by playing a club to the ace, then ruffed dummy’s last heart. Next, he led a club to the king then cashed the king of trumps, throwing a diamond from hand.

When West discarded a heart on the third round of trumps, declarer led the jack of clubs and was relieved to see that East followed. After winning this trick with the queen of clubs, declarer played the good ten of clubs.

East was now faced with a dilemma: if he discarded, that would be declarer’s ninth trick and the ace of diamonds would give him the contact. Alternatively, if he ruffed, he would then have to lead a diamond and declarer would make two diamonds and his contract.

MOYSIAN FIT: A contract in which declarer’s trump suit is divided 4-3, usually thus described when the selection is made deliberately. Named for Alphonse Moyse Jr., whose ardent advocacy of this choice was part of his case in favor of opening four-card majors and raising with three trumps. Source: https://www.acbl.org/learn_page/bridge-terminology/

The complete deal:

K 8 6
9 6 4
A Q 6 2
A K J
3 2
A K J 10 3 2
J 9
7 4 2
10 9 5 4
Q 8 7
K 10 4
8 6 5
A Q J 7
5
8 7 5 3
Q 10 9 3

Don’t forget – you can still enter for the 6th World Youth Open Bridge Championships being held in Croatia from 20 – 29 August.

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